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Perl & CGI tutorials
 ::   Intro to Perl/CGI and HTML Forms
 ::   Intro to Windows Perl
 ::   Intro to Perl 5
 ::   Intro to Perl
 ::   Intro to Perl Taint mode
 ::   Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Broken CGI Script
 ::   Writing COM Components in Perl

Java tutorials
 ::   Intro to Java
 ::   Cross Browser Java

Misc technical tutorials
 ::   Intro to The Web Application Development Environment
 ::   Introduction to XML
 ::   Intro to Web Design
 ::   Intro to Web Security
 ::   Databases for Web Developers
 ::   UNIX for Web Developers
 ::   Intro to Adobe Photoshop
 ::   Web Programming 101
 ::   Introduction to Microsoft DNA

Misc non-technical tutorials
 ::   Misc Technopreneurship Docs
 ::   What is a Webmaster?
 ::   What is the open source business model?
 ::   Technical writing
 ::   Small and mid-sized businesses on the Web

Offsite tutorials
 ::   ISAPI Perl Primer
 ::   Serving up web server basics
 ::   Introduction to Java (Parts 1 and 2) in Slovak

 

Introduction to Web Programming
Writing Applets  
  • If you have done any web surfing, you've probably already seen Java Applets. Applets are programs that run inside of a web page using the resources the web browser has to offer such as a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and the default set of class libraries.

  • When you initially hit a web page with an incorporated Java applet, you usually see a gray box where the applet will show up and then slowly, the applet loads and appears in the space of the gray box.

  • If you are looking for an example, Gamelan (http://www.gamelan.com) has hundreds.

  • In addition to appearing in a web page, applets can appear in their own windows. That is, they can appear within their own application frame which will popup from the web browser's window. This frame can be moved and iconified separately from the web browser's window.

  • However, applets that appear in their own window typically display a message like, "Warning: Applet Window" in the bottom of their frame. This tells the user that the frame is part of a Java applet running from inside the browser. The web browser designers added this feature to prevent an applet from masquerading as some other window, such as a system password entry window or as some other application.

  • The AWT class java.awt.Applet defines an applet. This class provides all of the basic features and methods which makeup an applet object.

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